Sunday March 30th, 2014
at 4:00 pm

NEW THIS SEASON!
First Light Studios, 34 Pleasant Street
Randolph, Vermont
Music for Piano Trio and Smaller Ensembles from Bach, Beethoven, Rachmaninoff, Beatles and RUHS student, Jacob Zimet
Admission: Free/Goodwill offering

Monday March 31st, 2014
Educational concerts for students of the
Randolph Union High School
and at the Elley-Long Music Center in Colchester
(Vermont Youth Orchestra Association)

Thursday August 14th, 2014
at 7:00 pm

NEW THIS SEASON
Violin Master Class
with festival artist Arturo Delmoni
in coordination with
the Vermont Youth Orchestra
Chandler Music Hall
Admission: Free

Saturday August 16th, 2014
at 8:00 pm

Saturday Concert Series
2 + 2 = 3 - Music for violin, cello and piano
Tartini, Rachmaninoff, Smetana
at Chandler Music Hall
Buy Tickets

Sunday August 17th, 2014
at 11:00 am

4nd Annual Breakfast with Bach
Brandenburg Concerto #3
in G Major, BWV 1048
Vivaldi Concerto for Two Cellos
in G Minor, RV 531
Breakfast at 11:00 am in the Esther Mesh Room
in Chandler's Upper Gallery
Admission at the door: $8:00
Concert at 12:30 pm in Bethany Church
Admission at the door: Goodwill offering
Food provided by
Three Bean Cafe of Randolph


Sunday August 17th, 2014
at 4:00 pm

An Encore Performance
Afternoon concert in Woodstock, VT
2 + 2 = 3 - Music for violin, cello and piano
Tartini, Rachmaninoff, Smetana
Admission is by donation

Thursday August 21st, 2014
at 7:00 pm
Open Rehearsal
at Chandler Music Hall
Admission: Free

Friday August 22nd, 2014
at 7:00 pm

Friday Night in the Gallery
a new approach to a festival concert
Jeremiah McLane and Annemieke Spoelstra
Accordion & Piano
at Chandler Music Hall - Downstairs Gallery
Admission: Free/Goodwill offering

Saturday August 23rd, 2014
at 7:00 pm

A Special Concert for Kids
Explore the music of Respighi
with VPR's Opera Host, Peter Fox Smith
and CVCMF musicians
at Chandler Music Hall
Admission at the door: $6.00

Sunday August 24th, 2014
at 4:00 pm

NEW THIS SEASON!
Matinee Concert
Quartets, more or less ...
Music for strings and voice

Beethoven, Kodály, Respighi, Debussy
at Chandler Music Hall
Buy Tickets





The Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival announces the release of its first highlight CD: Festival Harvest

"The Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival has come a long way since it was founded in 1993 by Peter Sanders, a New York cellist who grew up spending his summers in the Randolph area. An indication of just how far is its excellent New CD, "Festival Harvest," a compilation of live performances of works by Mendelssohn, Schönberg and Frank Bridge at the Chandler Music Hall in 2000 and 2004.

When I first heard the album, I had recently heard an excellent performance of Mendelssohn's A Major String Quintet at Vermont's justly revered Marlboro Music Festival. The same work opens this CD, and I actually preferred the Randolph performance. That's big praise."

Read the review from the December 2, 2005 issue of Vermont's Times Argus


History of The Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival

In the late summer of 1992, after taking part in the Crested Butte Chamber Music Festival (Colorado) Peter Sanders returned to Vermont and his family's summer home in the Randolph area. At that time, Chandler Music Hall was not getting the performance use it deserved as one of Vermont's premiere concert venues. After some discussion with his mother (who had the festival idea,) he was guided to speak with Laura Morris, at Chandler. Following some back and forth negotiations and under the umbrella of the A. B. Chandler Cultural Foundation, the Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival was created and season number one was presented in 1993.

August 1993 was a highly successful and critically acclaimed first season. The CVCMF applied for its own not-for-profit 501(c)(3) status in early 1994 which was granted. Originally very much a family run festival, the CVCMF has grown over the years. The Randolph area community has been very supportive and now assists with the production of an interesting variety of concerts including world-class chamber performances, an annual children's concert, a variety of radio performances and two open rehearsals. Spring concerts have become a tradition at the Three Stallion Inn in Randolph with presentations by string ensembles to consistently sold-out houses. Festival musicians also give a special annual concert at the local high school which is always enjoyed by students, faculty and performers alike.

In the summer of 2005 the CVCMF released its first highlight CD "Festival Harvest", which includes recordings from the 2000 and 2004 seasons. Wonderful performances of the Mendelssohn String Quintet in A Major, Op. 18, Schönberg - Verklarte Nacht, Op. 4 and the Frank Bridge Phantasie Trio (Trio No.1) in c minor are included. The CD was given a rave review by Jim Lowe the Times Argus newspaper critic. This disc is a fine example of the World-class Music in the Heart of Vermont that the festival offers.

The Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival has earned its reputation over the years as a major contributor to the summer music scene in Vermont and the Northeast. Be sure to encourage people to visit this website: www.centralvtchambermusicfest.org, and you are most welcome to join us as a Facebook friend!

Peter Sanders
Artistic Director


Reviews of The Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival

Music Review: At 21, more satisfying than ever

RANDOLPH - The Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival opened its 21st summer season Saturday at the Chandler Music Hall with an unusual program that proved most satisfying. Remaining concerts are in Randolph and Montpelier through next weekend.

The major work Saturday, though, was a staple of the chamber music repertoire. Johannes Brahms' 1865 "Horn Trio," the Trio in E-flat Major, Opus 40, is a grand and lyrical work, full of beauty, passion and deep emotion.

Pianist Jung Lin, violinist Basia Danilow and French hornist Ellen Dinwiddie Smith proved more than able in a moving and exciting performance. Lin, new to the festival, played with clarity, sensitivity and, when called for, power. Danilow, a staple of the festival, was warm and passionate, but always within Brahms' limits. Smith, another newcomer, played with warmth and lyricism.

The slow movement, Adagio mesto, proved particularly affecting, full of pathos and introspective emotional power. Although there were some rough edges, the final Allegro con brio drove to an exciting end.

Delightful is the best way to describe Dmitri Shostakovich's Five Pieces for Two Violins and Piano (arranged by Lev Atovmian from other works with the composer's sanction). Rather than Shostakovich's usual brooding darkness and sardonic wit, these pieces, though never insipid, are filled with warm lyricism and Slavic charm.

Danilow and Lin were joined by violinist Arturo Delmoni, a festival staple and New York virtuoso who plays frequently in Vermont, in a stylish and sensually beautiful performance. The sound was rich and warm as Delmoni and the Russian-born Danilow, complemented by Lin, "sang" these rich melodies.

Oddest was an obscure work by Ludwig van Beethoven, his one-movement Duo in E-flat Major for Viola and Cello, no masterpiece but full of typical Beethoven lyricism and interplay. Delmoni, this time on viola, and cellist Peter Sanders, the festival's founder and artistic director, had great fun with it and played it with aplomb. And it was beautiful.

Dessert was "Navarra (Danza Espagnola)," Opus 33, by the Spanish Romantic violin virtuoso Pablo de Sarasate. Delmoni and Danilow, with Lin's help, enjoyed the work's sweet virtuosity, a delicious mix of sensual Spanish lyricism and violin pyrotechnics. The performers had great fun with it - as did the audience.

Now 21 years old, the Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival has proved again to offer some of the most satisfying concerts among the state's many excellent summer classical music festivals.

Jim Lowe, Times Argus, VT - August 19, 2013
Copyright © 2013, Times Argus



Music Review From the Sublime to the Spectacular

The three major works were likely unknown to virtually anyone in the audience at the Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival's opening concert Saturday at Chandler Music Hall, but there certainly were no complaints - for they ranged from the sublime to the spectacular. Spectacular, if not quite a masterpiece, was Camille Saint-Saëns overtly virtuosic Piano Quartet in B-flat Major, Opus 41. Full of late French Romantic excess, the work is passionately lyrical, extremely demanding of its players, and exciting as well as joyful.

Saint-Saëns was one of the greatest pianists of his day, and this showed in the showy piano part. But pianist Thomas Schmidt delivered the powerful and often glittering solo part with aplomb and tonal beauty. Violinist Arturo Delmoni performed the other truly showy part with the flair of a virtuoso as well as his trademark lyrical expressive beauty.

Violist Katherine Anderson and cellist Peter Sanders, the festival's founder and artistic director, weren't let off the hook either. Although less heard, they delivered their parts with expertise and passion. Although it took a moment to get going, it was a truly exciting performance.

The Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival, now in its 20th year, brings New York instrumentalists, many of them members of the New York City Ballet orchestra, to Randolph for a couple of weeks each year to indulge in chamber music. (Sanders has been summering in Randolph at his family's seasonal home since childhood.) Like most festivals, the performances could afford a bit more rehearsal; conversely this festival's will match virtually any in the state.

At the other end of the spectrum from the Saint-Saëns was Jean Françaix's sublime String Trio in C Major. A comparatively quiet piece, the work is filled with subtle rhythms and colors as well as muted early 20th century French knotty harmonic language.

That muted effect didn't mean that the work lacked spirit. Delmoni, Aderson and Sanders played cohesively and with lyrical expressiveness, managing the complex rhythms to keep it light. The Andante, in particular, was beautifully tender, while the final Rondo: Vivo was jaunty and fun.

In between the two emotionally was Benjamin Britten's Phantasy Quartet, Opus 2, for oboe and strings. The oboe has a long lyrical line, punctuated and flavored by strings, enjoying Britten's unique salty rhythms and harmonies. Oboist Randall Wolfgang, with the aforementioned strings, played with a warm expressive lyricism and musical depth.

Still, the most tender moment was a sublimely beautiful performance of Robert Schumann's Romanze, Opus 28, No. 2, by cellist Sanders and pianist Schmidt. The solo piano work was arranged by Sanders' father, musicologist Ernest H. Sanders, and dedicated to the memory of Harry B. Watton, a major Randolph music supporter, who died last year.

For its second weekend, the Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival will present the Lark Quartet, at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 28, at Chandler, in the world premiere of "Big Time" by Randolph native Nico Muhly, and Janacek's String Quartet No. 2 ("Intimate Letters"). The Lark will be joined by violist Cyrus Beroukhim and cellist Sanders in Brahms' String Sextet No. 2 in G Major.

Jim Lowe, Rutland Herald, VT - August 20, 2012
Copyright © 2012, Rutland Herald



Central Vermont Chamber Festival is a gem

Despite being one of the best-kept secrets around, the Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival gets better and better.

Closing its 19th season at Chandler Music Hall on Saturday, the veteran festival players offered up a richly rewarding performance of Schumann's E-flat Major Piano Quartet, Opus 47. Pianist Jeewon Park, violinist Adela Peña, violist David Cerutti and cellist Peter Sanders, the festival's artistic director, played with passion as well as restraint, delivering the work's excitement and its grandeur.

The slow movement, Andante cantabile, in particular sang, with all three players giving it an overt expressiveness. The strings' singing lines were built upon Park's sensitive but powerful structure. And the finale was bold, lyrical and exciting.

This festival is, for some of its players, summer respite from orchestra playing. All are veteran players and most over 30, giving their performances a depth that can come only with age and experience.

The concert opened with a much more unusual work, Josef Suk's wonderfully melodramatic A Minor Piano Quartet, Opus 1. Suk (1874-1935), Dvorak's son-in-law, created richly Bohemian-flavored late Romantic music, some of it in the standard repertoire.

This piano quartet is a youthful work, written when Suk was 17, but smacks of maturity and depth. Violinist Basia Danilow, now second violinist with the Lark Quartet, Cerutti, Sanders and Park delivered the work's passion. The slow movement, Adagio, in particular was intimately and hauntingly beautiful.

The third work, the 1931 G Major String Trio, by early 20th-century British composer E.J. Moeran, was attractive but not deep. Peña, Cerutti and Sanders played well and with passion but could not make this rambling work a masterpiece. Still, the programming of unusual music is to be lauded as it adds perspective about where music and styles fit in.

The Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival has once again proven itself as one of the state's finest. If only more people could find Randolph ...

Jim Lowe, The Times Argus, VT - September 1, 2011




The Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival closed its 18th season Saturday at Chandler Music Hall, with a concert that wouldmatch in quality virtually any festival in the state - and, in Vermont, that's saying something. The major work and the biggest success on the program was Antonin Dvorak's String Quintet in G Major, Opus 77, a deeply lyrical work.

Violinists Cyrus Beroukhim and Adela Peña, violist Danielle Farina, cellist Peter Sanders, the festival's founder and director, and bassist Roger Wagner delivered a mature and expressive performance that successfully plumbed the work's depths.

Beroukhim, in particular, combined a warm and brilliant sound with a natural lyricism to make Dvorak's lines sing. But it was the ensemble as a whole that brought this rich tapestry cohesion and musical power. The slow movement, Poco andante, was intense, touching and sublime.

Peña, Beroukhim and Farina opened the program with a virtuosic performance of Zoltan Kodály's earthy 1920 Serenade, Opus 12, full of salty Hungarian folk influences, both harmonically and rhythmically.

The three played cohesively with flair as well as subtlety. Farina played with remarkable expressiveness. Real virtuosity as well as humor was heard in the Rossini's Duet in D Major for cello and bass. Sanders and Wagner had great fun with this operatic bonbon - as did the audience.

Jim Lowe, The Times Argus, VT - August 30, 2010




NYC Critic Impressed By Chamber Concert
by Peter Goodman, as appeared in the HERALD, Randolph, Vermont, August 27, 2009

It's been many years since I actually wanted to write a review. Decades spent in concert halls, museums, stadia and other places where music is presented have worn out my fingers and, unfortunately, dulled my senses.

In short, I was the kind of guy who would say, "Rats, gotta go to another opening at the Met tonight." (Tongue not completely embedded in cheek.)

But Saturday's Central Vermont Chamber Festival concert at Chandler Music Hall had me babbling by intermission. When Peter Sanders told his listeners from the stage that they don't know how lucky they are, he was dead right. Except that I think they do know how lucky they are. He's lucky, too.

Not only was the performance (of three good works, if not masterpieces) exceptional, but it had an exceptional audience. One could tell from the silence. And from the sense of smiles at particularly witty passages in Moritz Moszkowski's ebullient little Suite. From the complete stillnesses between movements---no rustling, no coughs, no shifting in seats or crackling of candy wrappers.

Chandler itself is a gem of a hall, understated and beautifully balanced. It was obvious that people were listening very closely, and for good reason. Chamber music is a conversation, and Saturday's discussion was on the highest level.

Of the three works on the program-the aforementioned Suite, Op. 71, for two violins and piano, Erno Dohnanyi's Serenade, Op. 10, for violin, viola and cello, and Felix Mendelssohn's Piano Quartet in c minor, Op. 1-the first was the most fully formed and the third the most promising. By the time of the Suite, Moszkowski was a composer in complete control of his medium. Listeners could easily follow the flow of thought, especially as advanced by violinists Arturo Delmoni and Adela Pena and pianist Jeewon Park.

Dohnanyi may still have been finding his own voice at the time of the Serenade, but it was already rich and romantic. Violist David Cerutti and cellist Sanders joined Delmoni in a warm, sometimes gorgeous interpretation.

Of the Mendelssohn Piano Quartet, written when he was 13, suffice it to say that there are flashes of beauty and moments when he's reaching beyond his grasp. Park's pianism sparkled, though Pena's sweet tone did not carry as well as it needed to.

Quibble, quibble---stop being a critic, already.

Here's the point:

In the lobby afterward, a woman wearing an open cast from ankle to thigh on her left leg was overheard explaining how that happened: "I had just chased the coyote from the chickens, and the ground was uneven. And I was tired from using the chainsaw and climbing on and off the tractor."

You're not likely to hear that in the lobby at Alice Tully Hall.

(For many years Peter Goodman was a music critic for Newsday and New York Newsday. He is the author of "Morton Gould: American Salute" (Amadeus), and is currently an assistant professor of journalism at Hofstra University, Hempstead, N.Y.)




"The Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival has become a welcome tradition in Randolph and the central Vermont area, and Saturday's impassioned high level illustrates just why."
Jim Lowe, The Times Argus, VT

"Pianist Albert Stanziano, violinist Arturo Delmoni and cellist Peter Sanders simply reveled in this over-the-top music (Joachim Raff - Piano Trio in a minor, Op. 155). Stanziano delivered the dramatic washes of notes with clarity and virtuosity, while Delmoni and Sanders plied the dramatic lines with passion. They also responded to the subtle moments with sensitivity, making this a grand - and fun - performance."
Jim Lowe, The Times Argus, VT

"Chamber music festival opens with finesse, spirit. Just when you think you've heard enough chamber music for the summer, someone comes along and performs the Mozart Clarinet Quintet - beautifully, in this case - and the passion returns immediately."
Jim Lowe, The Times Argus, VT

"The Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival has proven itself over its 10 years, becoming an important part of Vermontís musical fabric ... Saturdayís concert, which closed the season, was notable not only for its refinement of playing and ensemble, but its musical excitement."
Jim Lowe, The Times Argus, VT

"Foote's 1890 Piano Quartet in C Major, Opus 23, rather than profound, is traditional, grand and lyrical. And in the hands of these fine players, it was a joy to hear. Violinist Arturo Delmoni, violist Leslie Tomkins, cellist Peter Sanders and pianist Christopher Oldfather delivered a well-played and grand performance."
Jim Lowe, The Times Argus, VT

"The Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival has achieved a new level of excellence ... not only were the performances exciting, they were cohesive and satisfying."
Jim Lowe, The Times Argus, VT

"Chandler Music Hall's Central Vermont Chamber Music Festival has come into its own with some powerful performances, these ... players can hold their own with the best in Vermont."
Jim Lowe, The Times Argus, VT




The festival is a non-profit organization with 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status from the IRS.
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